Early Years

 

Our new early years program provides a hands on nature-based experience for Kindergarten and Foundation students to explore their local forest environment. Students have the opportunity to explore the forest, identifying the basic needs of living things and find out where and how their needs are met. While exploring the role of living and non-living things, in the forest, students will identify how they are interconnected. Learn about the features of a tree and the living things that can be found among them.

Early Years

 

Our new early years program provides a hands on nature-based experience for Kindergarten and Foundation students to explore their local forest environment. Students have the opportunity to explore the forest, identifying the basic needs of living things and find out where and how their needs are met. While exploring the role of living and non-living things, in the forest, students will identify how they are interconnected. Learn about the features of a tree and the living things that can be found among them.

Curriculum Links

 

Science

Explore relationships with other living and non living things. (EYLF)
  • Explore the different habitats within a forest, identifying the relationships between the living and non-living features of a forest.
  • Explore the role a tree plays in a forest system.
Develop an awareness of the impact of the interdependence of living things. (EYLF)
  • Explore leaf litter and the role it plays in meeting the needs of different living things in the forest.
  • Identify the living and non-living things in a forest and the connections between.
Living things have basic needs, including food and water (ACSSU002)
  • Explore the features of a tree and identify the role each feature plays in meeting the needs of the tree.
  • Explore leaf litter and the role it plays in meeting the needs of different living things in the forest.

HASS

The representation of the location of places and their features on simple maps and models (ACHASSK014)
  • Examine the way people interact with forest spaces and how they are managed.
  • Students draw features on a basic map outline as they walk around the area, identifying pathways, built features and vegetation types.

Plan your Excursion

  •  What is the purpose of your field trip? We can develop your program to suit your learning objectives and meet your curriculum needs. Please let us know anyway we can adapt the program to suit your students’ interest and learning needs.
  • Please notify us about any student with special needs. We can adjust your program to ensure everyone is involved.
  • Take advantage of our bus subsidy and fill your bus. Why not take two classes? The FEF has two teachers so taking two groups is not a problem, depending on the program.
  • In order to make your excursion planning easier the FEF has developed a Risk Assessment Plan. This document is written by the qualified teachers of the FEF. For a copy of the risk assessment document click here.
  • Bring along parent helpers. Extra assistance is always appreciated. We will get any parent helpers actively involved in the program.
  • Organise your students into small groups 4-6 groups depending on the class size.
  • Ensure your students are supervised at all times.
  • Prepare for all-weather possibility. Ensure your student have warm clothes, comfy shoes and wet weather gear.

Have fun! The forest is an amazing place. Get involved and enjoy the adventure with your students.

The Early Years program costs $150 per class. An invoice will be sent to the school following your excursion. School groups using externally hired transport may apply for a $100 bus subsidy.

Adopt A Tree

Find a tree in your schoolyard and make some observations. Give the students a few minutes to use their sense of smell, touch, hearing, and explore the space.

Guiding Questions:

  • What do we know about trees?
  • Do all trees look the same?
  • Close your eyes and lay down, what do you hear? What do you smell?
  • What do we notice about the different parts of the tree?
  • What words can we use to describe our tree?
  • What role might a tree play for other living things?

You might like to complete an observational drawing of your tree, sketch its leaves or take a bark rubbing.

  • Imagine that you are a tree in a forest and write a story about the interesting things that happen to you and around you.
  • Create a forest diorama, remembering to include all the different features of the forest.
  • Think about the ways a tree helps to meet the needs of other living things in the forest.

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